Posts Tagged ‘yes we can!…maybe’

That’s a Wrap

Tuesday, April 23rd, 2013

Some notes for the final stretch:

  • I will hold regular office hours this Thursday, 11-12.  On Friday, my office hour will be moved from late afternoon to 10-11 because of Kemp Symposium.
  • This blog will CLOSE for graded business on Saturday, April 27, at midnight.
  • You should check the blog before our final exam slot (Wednesday, May 1, 12-2:30) in case there are any announcements.
  • The final recitations/celebrations will be held in the Parlor of the Mansion.  Yummies are welcome.
  • Apparently the syllabus says that at the final exam you must recite a poem from the Norton anthology that is not on our syllabus.  ACK.  I blew that.  You may recite at least 14 contiguous lines from any poem of our primary authors or from the anthology.

A Far Cry from Africa

Sunday, April 14th, 2013

As Julia’s earlier post touched on, Walcott seems to ground us as his audience most specifically in terms of location, often through his titles; however, in his piece “A Far Cry from Africa,” I found the notion of “Africa” to be much more abstracting than stabilizing. Rather than “Africa,” Walcott’s title maybe improved upon by being more specific to the REAL issue at hand: “A Far Cry from Africanness.” If this sounds silly and reductive, that’s because it is, linguistically. But on some level, isn’t this what Walcott is actually addressing in this piece?

In any case, it seemed awfully timely to focus on this piece right after the Multicultural Fair, because that is precisely what strikes me most about it– how poignantly and obviously MULTIcultural it is. The cultural awareness does not necessarily stem from racial differences, although that’s definitely a huge aspect of it– just the sheer number of times Walcott brings “whiteness” into the text stands out in itself. However, it is the idea of betrayal of one’s heritage rather than race that sticks out the most– “Where shall I turn, divided to the vein?” (27) This is reminiscent of some of the language Langston Hughes uses when he writes of his biracial background, and yet he has accepted and exemplified his own blackness in no uncertain terms. I think it is always difficult knowing “where to turn” in situations of multinational understanding of the self. Thoughts, yeses and nos?

Incidentally, did anyone notice that the first stanza of this piece has ten lines, the second has eleven, and the third has twelve? Weird… 🙂

Also, for your viewing/listening pleasure:

“Africa” by Toto, an 80s classic. I still can’t quite figure out what they’re talking about, though…

 

 

For Monday

Saturday, April 13th, 2013

New Walcott  readings, replacing White Egrets:

The Sea is History

A Far Cry from Africa

Sea Grapes (or listen to DW read)

Dark August

 

Midsummer, Tobago

The Schooner Flight

Brooks essay

Friday, March 1st, 2013

Prompt posted.  Due date moved back to March 15.

Incidentally, if you were going home early tomorrow…

Thursday, February 28th, 2013

…what kind of sweet smackerel would you miss partaking in the MOST,cookies or brownies?

With that, see you ALL tomorrow! 😉

PS- This is a sacrifice, you realize: using an oven while studying Plath seems vaguely barbaric to me…

Thursday Poems. Redux.

Wednesday, February 20th, 2013

Comment below if you WOULD like to do Thursday Poems with CoPo on April 4 from 5-5:30.  You need not know now which poet you would like to read (and we might consider whether you all want a true hodgepodge or a theme or a representative sample or…).  What I have now: Upma (Bishop), Catherine (Plath), Andy, Abbie, possibly Erica.

Interpretive Performances Begin Friday

Sunday, February 10th, 2013

This Friday:

Eric, Karina, Mason, Hanna, Tricia, Mario, Andy, Chris

Full schedule will be posted under Assignments tab.

Yummies: I will be calling them “Beat Bites”

Monday, February 4th, 2013

Who likes almonds?

Who likes cranberries?

Who likes/loves/worships/adores/fantasizes about/freaks out in the trees over the beats??

GET EXCITED. I am attempting culinary things… 🙂

The Naughty List: February 3 Edition

Sunday, February 3rd, 2013

Allison

Chris

Eric

Gigi

Karina

Nico

Ty

Beats & Bop :)

Saturday, February 2nd, 2013

Okay, so Nico and I took Doug Gately’s “History of Jazz” class last year, and we got to learn alllllll about Bebop and its effects on American society/music as a whole. Like the poetry of/by the Beats, many Americans did not like or even necessarily understand the new form of jazz, and often rejected it in favor of more palatable/danceable Big-Band or R&B music. However, though marginalized, the Boppers (like the Beats) had a lasting influence on the art form, and their music appealed to other “elite” artists as well. Hence, the Beat poets were more open to the Bebop style than the average American listener.

Here’s a classic by Charlie “Bird” Parker, “Koko.” It’s pretty crazy. Enjoy! :)(For real though, try to count out the rhythm…CRAZY.)

Ko-Ko-Charlie Parker