Posts Tagged ‘stop drinking and start reading’

Contradicting contradictions

Saturday, April 27th, 2013

No one was more shocked than I was when Garrett opened his mouth for the second time all semester and dropped a bomb on the class, but I think before we all point fingers at him for being so closed minded we should try to consider this from another perspective. From what I’ve gathered, Garrett doesn’t seem to care for spoken word/slam poetry in general. His comment was not unique to Staceyann Chin. I believe he thinks that all spoken word/slam poetry has the tendency to become tantrum-like, so I think it is unfair to make accusations about his response being directly influenced by the speaker’s race and gender. Though these things should not be ignored, I don’t want to put words into anyone’s mouth either. I saw that Julia mentioned that Staceyann Chin is purposefully acting as the “angry black woman” caricature and if that’s the case, shouldn’t we think she is abrasive? Wouldn’t she want us to? Personally, I believe Staceyann Chin gave us a very raw and honest performance and I think that is why it was so shocking when Garrett outright dismissed it. However, no one had a problem with me nearly ripping my hair out when Amiri Baraka hoo-ed like an owl with the most unfortunate saxophone player alive. In the same vein, both poets were trying to get under the listeners skin, to aggravate them, to put them on edge. The saxophone was over the top and so were Staceyann Chin’s high knees.

For Monday

Saturday, April 13th, 2013

New Walcott  readings, replacing White Egrets:

The Sea is History

A Far Cry from Africa

Sea Grapes (or listen to DW read)

Dark August

 

Midsummer, Tobago

The Schooner Flight

Dead.

Tuesday, April 2nd, 2013

Although I don’t usually like poetry about war or battles, Komunyakaa’s word choice and descriptions just made me dead in every one of his poems in the Dien Cai Dau (Vietnamese for I am crazy or you make me crazy)  section for tomorrow. I particularly loved “You and I are Disappearing”. I looked up Bjorn Hakansson (the one who said the title) and he was a really cool guy-he had underdeveloped arms due to a pill his mom took during pregnancy and went on to form a group that helps others in similar situations. I don’t know the context in which the quote was said, but I’m curious as to why Komunyakaa chose that as the title.  (http://archive.eurordis.org/article.php3?id_article=1783)

I’m just going to list a few of my favorite lines/phrses because I just loved “You and I are Disappearing  so much:

  • The cry I bring down from the hills/ belongs to a girl still burning/ inside my head.
  • We stand with our hands/ hanging at our sides
  • She burns like oil on water.
  • A tiger under a rainbow / at nightfall.
  • She burns like a shot glass of vodka.
  • She rises like dragonsmoke/ to my nostrils.

As someone else mentioned, the line breaks are superbly orchestrated, giving the poem extra punch and adding an extra layer of awesomeness. I am just blown away by the creativity that takes place to come up with lines like “A tiger under a rainbow / at nightfall” when describing the girl burning. Komunyakaa is a genius when it comes to word choice and descriptions and I can’t wait to go all fangirl when we talk about him in class tomorrow.

 

Ariel: Sylvia-Ted Smackdown

Sunday, March 17th, 2013

Poems that are RED were not in Plath’s original manuscript, but were added by Ted Hughes for the 1965 edition of Ariel.

  1. Morning Song
  2. The Couriers
  3. Sheep in Fog 
  4. The Applicant
  5. Lady Lazarus
  6. Tulips
  7. Cut
  8. Elm
  9. The Night Dances
  10. Poppies in October
  11. Berck-Plage
  12. Ariel
  13. Death & Co.
  14. Lesbos – (This poem is censored in some conservative publications)
  15. Nick and the Candlestick
  16. Gulliver
  17. Getting There
  18. Medusa
  19. The Moon and the Yew Tree
  20. A Birthday Present
  21. Mary’s Song  (only in US version)
  22. Letter in November
  23. The Rival
  24. Daddy
  25. You’re
  26. Fever 103°
  27. The Bee Meeting
  28. The Arrival of the Bee Box
  29. Stings
  30. The Swarm  (only in US version)
  31. Wintering
  32. The Hanging Man
  33. Little Fugue
  34. Years
  35. The Munich Mannequins
  36. Totem
  37. Paralytic
  38. Balloons
  39. Poppies in July
  40. Kindness
  41. Contusion
  42. Edge
  43. Words

Plath’s version (on your syllabus).  Poems in BLUE are not in the Hughes version:

1. “Morning Song”

2.“The Couriers”

3. “The Rabbit Catcher” 

4. “Thalidomide” 

5. “The Applicant”

6. “Barren Woman”

7. “Lady Lazarus”

8. “Tulips”

9. “A Secret”

10. “The Jailor” 

11.  “Cut”

12. “Elm”

13. “The Night Dances”

14. “The Detective”

15. “Ariel”

16. “Death & Co.”

17. “Magi” 

18. “Lesbos”

19. “The Other”

20. “Stopped Dead” 

21. “Poppies in October”

22. “The Courage of Shutting-Up” 

23.“Nick and the Candlestick”

24. “Berck-Plage”

25. “Gulliver”

26. “Getting There”

27. “Medusa”

28. “Purdah” 

29. “The Moon and the Yew Tree”

30. “A Birthday Present”

31. “Letter in November”

32. “Amnesiac”

33. “The Rival”

34. “Daddy”

35. “You’re”

36. “Fever 103°”

37. “The Bee Meeting”

38. “The Arrival of the Bee Box”

39. “Stings”

40. “Wintering”

 

Ic Mus Plath Playlist

Friday, March 15th, 2013

04 Sun-Bees, Rain, Wind, Sun, You it’s all there for your listening, please pleasure.

08 Bel Air– probably the best one, but only probably

Wiki Wickedness about Plath:Plath was born on October 27, 1932, in the Massachusetts Memorial Hospital, in Boston’s Jamaica Plain neighborhood.[4] Her mother, Aurelia Schober Plath (1906–1994), was a first-generation American of Austrian descent, and her father, Otto Plath (1885–1940), was from Grabow, Germany.[5] Plath’s father was an entomologist and was professor of biology and German at Boston University; he also authored a book about bumblebees.[6] Plath’s mother was approximately twenty-one years younger than her husband.Otto had become alienated from his family after choosing not to become a Lutheran minister, as his grandparents had intended him to be.Otto Plath died on November 5, 1940, a week and a half after Plath’s eighth birthday,[6] of complications following the amputation of a foot due to untreated diabetes

Wiki Wickedness about Lana Del Rey aka Lana Del Rey Mar aka Lizzy Grant aka May Jailer aka Sparkle Jump Rope Queen

Del Rey was born Elizabeth Woolridge Grant in New York City on June 21, 1986,[1] to former Grey Group copywriter turned entrepreneur, Rob Grant, and former Grey account executive, Pat Grant.[2] She was raised in Lake Placid, New York[3][4] with two younger siblings.[2] She is of Scottish descent.[5] She began singing in church choirs when she was a child.[6] At fourteen, she was sent to Kent School, a boarding school in Connecticut, to deal with her alcohol dependence,[7][8] before heading back to her hometown at the age of eighteen. Del Rey then attended Fordham University in New York City, studying a branch of philosophy known as metaphysics [4][9][10] because “it bridged the gap between God and science. I was interested in God and how technology could bring us closer to finding out where we came from and why.”[11] She said, “that was when my musical experience began. I kind of found people for myself.”

 

These songs I’ve complied are great to skate to, great to wait to, great to be great to.  Have Fun or at least try to. So many other tracks too. The artists are, Two Door Cinema Club, The Kooks, and Lana Del Rey.  I did this because I Love You too.

Beware the Pronoun, Loved ones.

09 Eat That Up, It’s Good for You

03 Wake Up

01 Born to Die 02 Off to the Races

07 Dark Paradise 16 Video Games (Joy Orbison Remix) [

01 Ride

04 Body Electric

1-02 How’d You Like That

1-04 Taking Pictures of You

1-11 Eskimo Kiss 1-13 Carried Away (Bonus Track)

02 Come Back Home

09 Eat That Up, It’s Good for You

12 Remember My Name

06 Sleep Alone

11 Beacon

I’m obsessed with her. Whatever.

Wednesday, March 13th, 2013

post on Plath from the Houghton Library blog

More about Frieda

Monday, March 11th, 2013

Erica has posted a really interesting Q&A article with Frieda Hughes already, but I found this article that I thought was really interesting too.

In the article Frieda Hughes is quoted on how she is against BBC’s 2003 movie, Sylvia. The article also includes two verses of her poetic response to the movie, titled “My Mother” (I found the full poem on Tumblr but didn’t want to post it because I didn’t know how accurate it was). The poem uses a lot of images from “Lady Lazarus,” which i think is kind of interesting. In the article one of the verses starts out with Plath’s “peanut crunching crowed,” which Frieda Hughes calls the “peanut eaters.”

Ooooh, who’s that lady…Lazarus? ;)

Monday, March 11th, 2013

All right, I’m gonna be really original and blog about the piece we discussed in class today, just like everyone and his/her mother has already done…

Just a couple of religious/lingfuistic things I wanted to bring up in class that we didn’t really have time to address:

  • Lucifer rhymes with Crucifer. Not significant for the poem’s purpose, but I love wordplay and this just occurred to me.
  • Speaking of wordplay, the last line, “I eat men like air” takes on a whole new meaning if we substitute it for “I eat men like Herr”–! In and by consuming men AND deities, the speaker becomes the monstrous “dark power” that has the power to destroy and rise all the more powerful regularly…every ten years, to be exact.
  • Jesus raised Lazarus in the Bible…who is “raising” the speaker here? By “performing her own miracle,” is she, as she describes, becoming Jesus, i.e. God?

Just some stuff to mull over…

The “V” is Silent

Friday, March 8th, 2013

The oceans in wood, the ages in waves.

We shred up the years and make them a page.

We grow into sage, must learn to aim rage.

Shackles, tears to ankles in these cages.

 

At least I’m standing, better than drifting.

In perspiration, tears from eyes to ears.

The sting of floating on your back. On my

Own too, in Velvet, blue. Oh, how could I

 

Forget You? Who gave me limbs to paddle.

And when they nag, Oh, the saddle engraved

“V.”

They won’t ride me to the grave. I’ll try my

 

Best to behave! To behave. But will I

have to cut my mane? I am a Man. Right?

 

No! I’m a child in heat and I wanna

Dance in the street. Free verse straight to the hearse.

vmc03/08/13

Response to Probably not substantive enough to be post-worthy, but…

Friday, March 8th, 2013

America why are your libraries full of tears?
America when will you send your eggs to India?
I’m sick of your insane demands.
When can I go into the supermarket and buy what I need with my good looks?
America after all it is you and I who are perfect not the next world.
Your machinery is too much for me.
You made me want to be a saint.
There must be some other way to settle this argument.-Who else but Ginsberg?(sickedwickedness)

I aim at this section of, America , because of Cobain and Plath’s “attractiveness.” Cobain’s music was attractive. Plath’s poetry was attractive. But “America” wants us to believe that their suicide was attractive because “America” wants us to think that “its machinery is too much for us.” The affect that drugs have on an artist and the artist’s mind state is very real.  The affect that fans have on the artist are very real because of all the pressure the artist is put under because of their fame and are almost looked at as a “saint” when in reality they are far from it because they are destroying the very beautiful bodies backstage that their fans fantasize.  Can we blame “America”? or Do we blame the artist?

 I totally respect them as mainstream idyllic figures because their form(their physical attractiveness) and their content (their poetry and music) should be respected we cannot argue with how handsome Cobain was or how pretty Plath was.  My opinion is that their ending was ugly.  Too many fans look to these people, I mean, idyllic symbols as more than human and become confused.  I am not confused about it because I’m sure these artists did not feel that they were as attractive as we thought they were.  Plath didn’t have enough education and Cobain took too many drugs to cope and what a slippery slope and you lose sight of Hope when your Dream has been accomplished and you can’t make it to the finish, is it too late too replenish the soul you chose to diminish?  No, it’s not too late. Life is a big Responsibility and the more you are given the more you are responsible for. What do I know? but “Rumor has it!!” ha ha ha

 However, you can’t argue with the beauty of an early death either because where I was raised, here in America, that’s what I was always reminded. And a few words from a brother of mine Kanye  Omari West in America (please don’t get caught up on the form and only try to see the content):

 “The block is at war, post dramatic stress, ran up outta pillz, rob dat CVS, niggas gettin bust over in Gods we trust, We believe in God butdo God believe in us?,if we believe enough will we ever get to know him, that lean got us dosin’ ,if we get there we the chosen, i been poppin shit for too long, but still reppin where I came from”-Kanye West

 “Dr. Martin Louis The King Jr. and imma never let the dream turn to Krueger’s”-Kanye West

I could write shorter sermons but when I get started I’m too lazy to stop.-Lincoln