Posts Tagged ‘irrepressible nudist’

That’s a Wrap

Tuesday, April 23rd, 2013

Some notes for the final stretch:

  • I will hold regular office hours this Thursday, 11-12.  On Friday, my office hour will be moved from late afternoon to 10-11 because of Kemp Symposium.
  • This blog will CLOSE for graded business on Saturday, April 27, at midnight.
  • You should check the blog before our final exam slot (Wednesday, May 1, 12-2:30) in case there are any announcements.
  • The final recitations/celebrations will be held in the Parlor of the Mansion.  Yummies are welcome.
  • Apparently the syllabus says that at the final exam you must recite a poem from the Norton anthology that is not on our syllabus.  ACK.  I blew that.  You may recite at least 14 contiguous lines from any poem of our primary authors or from the anthology.

Spoken Word Videos for next week

Monday, April 15th, 2013

1.  For Monday:

Go to Def Poetry on channel musikslove (81 videos) and watch the following:

  • Black Ice, “Imagine” #16
  • Gina Loring, “Somewhere There Is a Poem” #19
  • Sunni Patterson, “We Made It” #76
  • Suheir Hammad, “First Writing Since” #77

Go to urbanrenewalprogram (80 videos) and watch the following:

  • Linton Kwesi Johnson, “If I was a top notch poet”
  • Staceyann Chin, “If only out of vanity”
  • Jessica Care Moore, “I’m a hip-hop cheerleader”
  • Erykah Badu, “Friends, fan, and artists”
  • Danny Hoch, “Corner Talk, September”
  • Amiri Baraka, “Why is we Americans”
  • Beau Sia, “Give me a chance”
  • Taylor Mali, “What teachers make”

2. For Wednesday:

Videos are student choice.  In Comments on this post, provide the name of the artist, the name of the poem, and the link (paste it in and it will go live when you post the comment).   RULES:

  • The poem must be recorded in a performance, and should NOT be a video production.
  • Each student may post only one video, so choose wisely!  It is NOT mandatory that you choose a poem.

daM goD

Tuesday, April 2nd, 2013

During Monday’s discussion of “Looking a Mad Dog Dead in the Eyes,” Sarah’s comment about reading “Mad Dog” as an anagram blew my mind.

I believe the speaker is criticizing man’s relationship with God. Furthermore, I think the speaker is calling on man to take back control and suggests that man should assert his power over God.

I think this has to be a myth, or at least partially a myth, but growing up I was always told that there was a simple way to establish dominance with a dog (granted, I was terrified of dogs much of my young life so there’s a good chance this was a lie adults told me, thinking I might find it comforting). I was told that one must look a dog dead in the eyes and hold its gaze to assert power until the dog ultimately looks away.

I think it’s interesting to think that this poem is criticizing the way we have been trained to worship God and calling on us, instead, to train God…even if this all does sound a bit Mad.

Vollmer essay prompt is posted

Sunday, March 31st, 2013

Ariel: Sylvia-Ted Smackdown

Sunday, March 17th, 2013

Poems that are RED were not in Plath’s original manuscript, but were added by Ted Hughes for the 1965 edition of Ariel.

  1. Morning Song
  2. The Couriers
  3. Sheep in Fog 
  4. The Applicant
  5. Lady Lazarus
  6. Tulips
  7. Cut
  8. Elm
  9. The Night Dances
  10. Poppies in October
  11. Berck-Plage
  12. Ariel
  13. Death & Co.
  14. Lesbos – (This poem is censored in some conservative publications)
  15. Nick and the Candlestick
  16. Gulliver
  17. Getting There
  18. Medusa
  19. The Moon and the Yew Tree
  20. A Birthday Present
  21. Mary’s Song  (only in US version)
  22. Letter in November
  23. The Rival
  24. Daddy
  25. You’re
  26. Fever 103°
  27. The Bee Meeting
  28. The Arrival of the Bee Box
  29. Stings
  30. The Swarm  (only in US version)
  31. Wintering
  32. The Hanging Man
  33. Little Fugue
  34. Years
  35. The Munich Mannequins
  36. Totem
  37. Paralytic
  38. Balloons
  39. Poppies in July
  40. Kindness
  41. Contusion
  42. Edge
  43. Words

Plath’s version (on your syllabus).  Poems in BLUE are not in the Hughes version:

1. “Morning Song”

2.“The Couriers”

3. “The Rabbit Catcher” 

4. “Thalidomide” 

5. “The Applicant”

6. “Barren Woman”

7. “Lady Lazarus”

8. “Tulips”

9. “A Secret”

10. “The Jailor” 

11.  “Cut”

12. “Elm”

13. “The Night Dances”

14. “The Detective”

15. “Ariel”

16. “Death & Co.”

17. “Magi” 

18. “Lesbos”

19. “The Other”

20. “Stopped Dead” 

21. “Poppies in October”

22. “The Courage of Shutting-Up” 

23.“Nick and the Candlestick”

24. “Berck-Plage”

25. “Gulliver”

26. “Getting There”

27. “Medusa”

28. “Purdah” 

29. “The Moon and the Yew Tree”

30. “A Birthday Present”

31. “Letter in November”

32. “Amnesiac”

33. “The Rival”

34. “Daddy”

35. “You’re”

36. “Fever 103°”

37. “The Bee Meeting”

38. “The Arrival of the Bee Box”

39. “Stings”

40. “Wintering”

 

I’m obsessed with her. Whatever.

Wednesday, March 13th, 2013

post on Plath from the Houghton Library blog

Greetings from San Francisco

Sunday, March 3rd, 2013

For Spring Break, I am in San Francisco visiting with my Mom, who moved here about a year ago. Before I get all braggy about how BEAUTIFUL this city is, I need to come clean about a couple of things. First I should admit that I threw an enormously irrational temper tantrum when I found out she was moving here because HOW COULD SHE LEAVE ME ON THE EAST COAST ALONE? And second, I spent a sizable amount of my first visit to the Bay area wrapped in a blanket on the couch in a state of panic because HOW WAS SHE GOING TO SURVIVE WITHOUT ME ON THE WEST COAST? Luckily my strange anxieties have dissipated (unlike the ever-lingering fog) and I have come to realize how freakin’ cool this city is and how much cooler my Mom is for moving here.

Today was a long day- we walked for miles along the Embarcadero and accidently drove over the Golden Gate Bridge on the way back to our apartment (which just so happens to be on the opposite side of the city). I also had a nerd-attack and forced my family to stop by City Lights bookstore. It’s on the corner of this great street that borders Chinatown and Little Italy. Inside there are three flights of floor-to-ceiling bookshelves filled with some of the most famous and obscure books, all meshed together. The third floor was devoted solely to poetry books and was where I lingered for a little too long. I snapped some photographs for your viewing pleasure. Check it:

photo 1

 

photo 2

photo 4

I hope you are all enjoying your time off as much as I am. Ps- do I get extra credit for posting over Break??

 

 

Brooks essay

Friday, March 1st, 2013

Prompt posted.  Due date moved back to March 15.

Incidentally, if you were going home early tomorrow…

Thursday, February 28th, 2013

…what kind of sweet smackerel would you miss partaking in the MOST,cookies or brownies?

With that, see you ALL tomorrow! 😉

PS- This is a sacrifice, you realize: using an oven while studying Plath seems vaguely barbaric to me…

Where’s the poetry in today’s Climate Movement?

Wednesday, February 20th, 2013

In the interest of Miss Gwendolyn Brooks, Black Arts Poetry and  Allen Ginsberg’s “queer shoulder to the wheel”, I want to talk a little bit about poetry as a mode for change.

As some of you may know, when i’m not reading verse or fretting over thesis due dates, I organize for the Youth Climate Movement. The organization that signs my pay checks is Greenpeace, but the students I work with don’t fit into any one network. Most of them attend or have just graduated from American universities, where they work(ed) on clean energy initiatives such as shutting down the coal plant that both fires and pollutes their campus or amending the investment portfolio of said institution to keep from furthering the fossil fuel industry’s crippling monopoly. It’s exciting work and vital to the future of our planet and species alike. I feel honored to be a part of it–if only for it’s allowing me to experience that “cog in a machine so much larger than myself” feeling on a regular basis. Just this weekend, in fact, I had the immense pleasure of marching on the White House 45,000 strong to demand a #forwardonclimate initiative from our president.

856529_4315645820648_170608870_o

(Where’s the CoPo Waldo? I’ll give you a hint: I’m the one putting a turtleneck to good use in Sunday’s 12 degree weather.)

My Point: Despite all it’s charm, creativity and (let’s be honest) just plain good looks, the Youth Climate Movement lacks that key artistic component so many of the movements before it capitalized on: a soundtrack.

I often ask myself: WHERE is the poetry which (according to Audre Lorde) “gives name to ideas that are nameless and formless, about to be birthed, yet already felt”? The poetry that is not a luxury, but a vital necessity to out existence.” WHERE is the revolutionary poem which (according to Andrienne Rich) “reminds [us ] where and when and how [we] are living and might live”? The poetry that was once described as “the wick of desire”. “The imagining of a different reality requires telling and retelling the terrible true story” wrote Miss Rich. WHERE is our poetry that narrates and witnesses?

The Civil Right’s Movement had Maya Angelou’s “Still I Rise“.

The Anti-War movement had Allen Ginsberg’s “America“.

At least the Feminist effort had Andrienne Rich’s “Aunt Jennifer’s Tigers” to go off of.

Where’s the poetry in today’s Climate Movement?