Posts Tagged ‘Don’t stop Lil’ Wayne. Run Weezy Run!’

In Response to “Contradicting Contradictions”

Tuesday, April 30th, 2013

Where was this passion all semester?! I feel as if spoken-word should be performed exactly the way each author performs it. I’m almost afraid to label it a performance. Speaking a poem rather than having to type it in print opens the door for emotions to be free. When I read Sylvia Plath and Amiri Baraka poetry I can see their passion in their words and punctuation on the page and attempt to read each piece as active as they may read it if they had the opportunity to let their emotions be wild and free on stage. I don’t think I know about the Staceyann Chin performance that you are talking about. To say that Staceyann is  “acting” like an angry black women is to judge and marginalize her performance, to remove Staceyann Chin from her piece, and to throw her into an archetype of an “angry black woman”: this is where I find the issue. I would say that Stacey Chin is being an angry Stacey Chin. The closed mindedness is when to categorize and lable wild free emotions to help you understand it. You basically put the wild free emotion back in a cage when you use “acting like an angry black woman” as a description of art.  I wanted to talk about the saxophone player that most likely looked forward to having the honor of playing along with Amiri Baraka.  However, I do feel that Amiri chose to have a white saxophonist to add to the message of the poem. The poem that we watch by Amiri Baraka broke the allowance of white people, in this country, to always be free from guilt. While they blame the colored people that live in this country (not just black people).  The class fell right back into what Amiri Baraka was trying to break.  The white man became the victim and Amiri Baraka was laughed at.  I wasn’t surprised. Consider Kanye West’s video with the white ballerinas (do u think those ballerina were unfortunate too) and the black people as civilized having dinner(Kanye west took it a step past black and white because even the black people wouldnt accept the women he brought to dinner because she was different and wanted to lable her as weird and strange because of their closed mindeness.) The same point was trying to be made by Amiri I would guess to have the white people do the work and perform for black people for once.  But if we go as far as to say that it was strategic by Amiri Baraka we already begin to criminalize him because we are saying that it was premeditated.  So Molly I must say that I do have a problem with you “nearly ripping your hair out when Amiri hooed like an owl.”  You did not understand the symbolic significance of the owl within the context of the poem so your closed mind could only laugh to set you free from your mental prison as Amiri Baraka successfully got under your skin and aggravated you. I’m sure there are more unfortunate saxophone players out there.  I was very disappointed how the class responded to Amiri Baraka’s poem how we weren’t as open minded as we act. Now look at Kanye West’s Video After we saw Amiri Baraka where will your brain take you.

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=thEQlaqhHeY

Response to Probably not substantive enough to be post-worthy, but…

Friday, March 8th, 2013

America why are your libraries full of tears?
America when will you send your eggs to India?
I’m sick of your insane demands.
When can I go into the supermarket and buy what I need with my good looks?
America after all it is you and I who are perfect not the next world.
Your machinery is too much for me.
You made me want to be a saint.
There must be some other way to settle this argument.-Who else but Ginsberg?(sickedwickedness)

I aim at this section of, America , because of Cobain and Plath’s “attractiveness.” Cobain’s music was attractive. Plath’s poetry was attractive. But “America” wants us to believe that their suicide was attractive because “America” wants us to think that “its machinery is too much for us.” The affect that drugs have on an artist and the artist’s mind state is very real.  The affect that fans have on the artist are very real because of all the pressure the artist is put under because of their fame and are almost looked at as a “saint” when in reality they are far from it because they are destroying the very beautiful bodies backstage that their fans fantasize.  Can we blame “America”? or Do we blame the artist?

 I totally respect them as mainstream idyllic figures because their form(their physical attractiveness) and their content (their poetry and music) should be respected we cannot argue with how handsome Cobain was or how pretty Plath was.  My opinion is that their ending was ugly.  Too many fans look to these people, I mean, idyllic symbols as more than human and become confused.  I am not confused about it because I’m sure these artists did not feel that they were as attractive as we thought they were.  Plath didn’t have enough education and Cobain took too many drugs to cope and what a slippery slope and you lose sight of Hope when your Dream has been accomplished and you can’t make it to the finish, is it too late too replenish the soul you chose to diminish?  No, it’s not too late. Life is a big Responsibility and the more you are given the more you are responsible for. What do I know? but “Rumor has it!!” ha ha ha

 However, you can’t argue with the beauty of an early death either because where I was raised, here in America, that’s what I was always reminded. And a few words from a brother of mine Kanye  Omari West in America (please don’t get caught up on the form and only try to see the content):

 “The block is at war, post dramatic stress, ran up outta pillz, rob dat CVS, niggas gettin bust over in Gods we trust, We believe in God butdo God believe in us?,if we believe enough will we ever get to know him, that lean got us dosin’ ,if we get there we the chosen, i been poppin shit for too long, but still reppin where I came from”-Kanye West

 “Dr. Martin Louis The King Jr. and imma never let the dream turn to Krueger’s”-Kanye West

I could write shorter sermons but when I get started I’m too lazy to stop.-Lincoln