Posts Tagged ‘copo’

Close Minded Perceptions of Poetry

Thursday, April 25th, 2013

In light of our discussion over the last few days, I wanted to bring our attention to a statement that Nicco made about hearing a spoken word piece as a monologue  in a movie. I was talking to Julia the other day & I interpreted his statement as if he felt that the presentation of that particular poem was more of an act than that of a way of self expression.

 

I want to know if anyone else felt like that. Are& slam poets putting on an act?

John Rives Spoken Word

Tuesday, April 23rd, 2013

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LbtVepS53t0

Hey all this guy is really great! I thought this performance is also really cool because he incorporates sign language into it. Enjoy!

Walcott on Empire and Language

Sunday, April 14th, 2013

I thought this interview would be a good addition to the blog because Walcott speaks directly about empire, a prominent theme in his poetry that we focused on in Friday’s class. He gives an interesting definition of empire from his own perspective, and discusses his culturally and racially diverse background. He and the interviewer also engage in a discussion about language towards the end of the interview.  I think the last minute of the interview is also a highlight!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2EEgIhJfwcg

Still Looking for “The Lost Empire”

Friday, April 12th, 2013

I left class today feeling conflicted over our interpretation of Walcott’s Caribbean in “The Lost Empire”.

Now I have never been the Caribbean myself. However, I do sail, and that interest has thrust me into a community of those who spend winters there, maintaining boats whose owners are unwilling to both risk the damages of an east coast mooring or crew the vessel themselves. The result of this intimacy gives me an interesting perspective on the archipelago which Walcott describes to “look as if a continent fell and scattered into fragments” (lyric II, lines 2-3). This perspective is one which begs me argue against sentiments of the “small place produc[ing] nothing but beauty.”

The islands I perceive are home to a giant social george. That is, a gaping  chasm between rich and poor. The exact opposite of a “simplifying light” the author illustrates four lines from the bottom. Perhaps those who can afford it are “receiving vessels of each day’s grace”, but those who cannot seem to be receiving vessels of capitalist colonial fallout. Without an infrastructure to protect them from exploitation, the islands have become a bona fide waste basket for the overnight tourism boom. Pollution runs rampant under a disposable standard, and a people who may have once attempted to husband the albeit picturesque landscape are now plagued with Western growing pains.

It surprises me that Walcott doesn’t see this. Or that we are unable to trace an appropriate irony in his “content”. Lyrics I and II must be sewn together somehow. After centuries of haunting, “The Spectre of Empire” surely didn’t just pack up and leave….

…right?

images

Vollmer Quotables, The Newest Greeting Card Sensation:

Sunday, March 31st, 2013

Unknown

“I’m always trying to push the narrative line to it’s greatest intensity.”

“Spring cleaning was a military operation in our house. My grandmother rolled up her pant legs then took her teeth out.”

“It’s OK to have a mundane life, you just have to do the work; make the effort to see things differently.”

“I come from the school of get drunk: on wine, on poetry, on the world–be altered.”

I’m a line! I’ll do WHATEVER I wanna do!!

Monday, March 25th, 2013

Lines do what they want to do?

  • Focus of process and form
  • Not on depth
  • Form grows out of the content

Do you agree or disagree?

Emerson’s work often requires that we trace etymologies?

Monday, March 25th, 2013

Do you think it’s necessary in bettering or understanding of the poetry itself? (not only with her work) but with poets in general?

Experiments=lack of flow?

Monday, March 25th, 2013

When you experiment with the form of a poem does it disrupt your intended flow?

sylvia plath reads Daddy

Monday, March 25th, 2013

Womanhood

Wednesday, February 27th, 2013

I love how she used this poem to represent the sonnet.

 

What do you think of her decision to make the I “children of the poor”?